SUPERMAN’S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN #143November 1971 
This is what would become of most of Jack Kirby’s art when he started work at DC. When he turned in his pencilings it would be inked and then handed off to veteran DC artist Murphy Anderson to finish. That meant making the characters look more in line with “accepted” company interpretations, which were largely in the style of Curt Swan. Jack wasn’t happy and a lot of readers weren’t either. 
Jack Kirby’s original Superman drawing is on the left and Murphy Anderson’s finished Superman is on the right.
Zoom Info
SUPERMAN’S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN #143November 1971 
This is what would become of most of Jack Kirby’s art when he started work at DC. When he turned in his pencilings it would be inked and then handed off to veteran DC artist Murphy Anderson to finish. That meant making the characters look more in line with “accepted” company interpretations, which were largely in the style of Curt Swan. Jack wasn’t happy and a lot of readers weren’t either. 
Jack Kirby’s original Superman drawing is on the left and Murphy Anderson’s finished Superman is on the right.
Zoom Info

SUPERMAN’S PAL, JIMMY OLSEN #143
November 1971 

This is what would become of most of Jack Kirby’s art when he started work at DC. When he turned in his pencilings it would be inked and then handed off to veteran DC artist Murphy Anderson to finish. That meant making the characters look more in line with “accepted” company interpretations, which were largely in the style of Curt Swan. Jack wasn’t happy and a lot of readers weren’t either. 

Jack Kirby’s original Superman drawing is on the left and Murphy Anderson’s finished Superman is on the right.